Q. Why is there a vice on my living room wall?

A. The Mister got bored again.

Since we listed the house he’s got time on his hands again. He spent a couple days last weekend cleaning out our garden shed. It was packed to the gills. A bunch of the stuff was from the former owner, including this really cool looking vintage, red vice.

Meanwhile, I had to work. Forgive me while I digress from our topic for a minute. I was photographing and taking video at two Change The Play summer camps. The Change the Play program was created Colts quarterback Andrew Luck and Riley Children’s Health as a way to teach young people about the importance of good nutrition, exercise and general well-being. Children 5-13 are invited to join in the fun and learn while they’re at it. CTP also has a program for elementary schools called the Change the Play Challenge and an online Kids Club.

I took some fun pictures, here’s a few of my favorites.





 

Colts QB Stephen Morris came out to help too. Between passing footballs to the kids tended to some of their other needs.





When I came home Sunday evening I found this on the wall separating the living room from the kitchen:





The conversation went something like this:

I was like: What is this?

He was like: I knew you wouldn’t want me to throw that cool vice away.

I was like: What?

He was like: I found it in the shed.

I was like: You’re bored again, aren’t you?

He was like: I knew you’d like it.

We’re still not sure what we’re going to use it for. He swapped out that little piece of wood for a longer. Even though it help my freshly canned raspberry jam, it was too much.

I’d love to hear what you think we should do with the vice on the wall?



I’m not gonna lie….

….using power tools makes me feel like a bad @$$.

This past week and I got my fill of using them.

First, I helped the Mister finish up the deck.

We’d worked out quite the system. He’d put in the first row of screws to make sure everything was square or level, and I’d come along later to put in the extra ones.

Saturday, after the storms blew through, we put up our corrugated metal ceiling on the covered patio.



I’m totally jealous of the outdoor living space for this home!

Here’s how it looked before the work began. Not a space I’d want to spend any time in.

The Mister had to cut some of the pieces so they’d go around the support posts. It made pretty sparks. ūüôā And, for the record, he doesn’t let me us that power tool. ūüôĀ

Before we started he had this genius idea to put a brace up to rest the panels on as we slid them into place. I couldn’t get a picture of that in action because there were only two of us. But, in the one below you can see the piece of wood he used. This made it so much easier!





Here’s a closeup of the metal.

Once we finish this covered porch and get the landscaping finished I’ll post new pictures.

I also got to use the reciprocating saw to try to remove some flooring from the laundry room. That wasn’t a fun job, it was much harder than using the little cordless drill.

Gotta run, time to ice my shoulder.



Reinstalling trim after painting it can be confusing

Here’s some tips on how to reduce the stress of it all!

We got our carpet and it looks fabulous!!! I mean, it goes well with the colors on the walls and the house is starting to look like a home and you can lay down on the floor if you want and you’re not going to get up and be all dirty. And, going without shoes is a must! So cozy.

It’s awesome, until you look at the trim.

Yeah, it looks old and dated and gross. I thought the original dark wood trim would look charming. Nope, I was wrong, again.



And to reenforce how wrong I was, our awesome realtor Jill Collins (you may remember her from this post: 5 Tips for Buying a Home) ¬†took one look into the first bedroom and said,¬†“you’re going to paint the trim, right?”

I was like: Uhhhh.

She was like: Right?

I was like: But the carpet.

She was like: Right?

I was like: But…….yes, of course we’re going to paint the trim.

She was like: Great. ūüôā

So, we thought about taping the carpet but that’s just crazy. It’s expensive. It’s risky. It’s time consuming.



The Mister said he’d take the trim off the walls and we could paint it that way. Which was fantastic because it literally took three coats each!

But then the nightmares started. We’d take it off and then not be able to figure out where the pieces went.

But alas, we devised a plan.

As he took each piece off the wall he left it laying on the floor. Then he carefully marked each piece with: which room it came out of, a number starting from the left and going clockwise, and which side of the room it was on.

This made it so much easier to remember where each piece went when it was time to put it back on.

Now our rooms look fantastic! I can’t wait to share the before and after pictures!



Bless this home

When our church moved out of its storefront location into a free-standing building our pastor invited us to come in and write blessings, Bible verses and prayers on the floor before the tile was installed.

I remember kneeling near what would become a modest indoor waterfall and writing a prayer for some of my dearest family and friends who didn’t yet know Jesus. They didn’t know that he was sent to earth to cover our sins, the sins that keep us from heaven. They’d hear of him sure, but they didn’t trust him. They thought you could get to heaven by doing good works and being a “good person.”

At least two of them have come to trust Jesus, I’m still praying for the others.



I loved the idea of blessing a place. When the Mister remodeled our sunroom at the home we live in, I wrote blessings on the floor for us and anyone who enters our home. That sunroom is easily our favorite room in the house and it’s were visitors gravitate to and relax in. Many have told me how peaceful it is in there.

I knew I wanted to do the same thing at the investment property. Beyond the drama we’ve discovered that went on in this house , I wanted to really bless the new owners, and all who step foot in there.

So, as people stopped by to check it out, or to lend a hand, I asked them share their favorite verse or write a blessing or prayer.

We saw at least one contractor read a verse. Here¬†are the¬†ones we’ve gathered so far.

My prayer for all who enter.
A friend’s verse, the one we saw a contractor read.
This verse is close to my friend’s heart. It was one of the first he learned when he started trusting¬†in jesus.
Probably the most popular verse in the Bible. It pretty much sums it up! This is in a child’s room.
And so is this one. Another awesome verse to lean into.




sometimes people think christians are stuffy and can’t have fun. I thought this Was perfect For the kitchen.
A pryaer for the master bedroom.
Another prayer for the master bedroom. And for me too!

 

I hope this post has blessed you in some way today. If it has, please share it.

Now it’s your turn. What blessing, verse or prayer would you share?



How to remove carpet, hillbilly style

It ain’t your daddy’s method, or maybe it is.

This is your how-to guide on how to remove carpet that is glued to a cement floor the hillbilly way.

Tools you’ll need:

  • Boxcutter
  • Tow rope
  • Chain
  • Pickup truck (any brand will do, we prefer Chevy, mama prefers Dodge-I have no idea why)

Now just watch this short, easy-to-follow video to see how it’s done.

I’d love to hear about your carpet removal ventures and which brand of pickup truck you prefer!



No hillbillies were injured in the filming of this video.

Look at what I can do!

Regular readers of this blog know that I like to do things fast and I don’t go near the edges. If you’re new to the blog, you can click here¬†or here to see what I’m talking about.

So, what I’m about to say is going to blow your mind!

Are you ready?




That’s my hand, pictured at the top! Trimming! With actual paint and without tape or an edger!

I know, right!??!!

And I’m good at it.

Here’s the even weirder part:
I like it!
It’s fun!
It relaxes me!
I’m an edging maniac!

How did that happen?

Has anyone else experienced such a huge change in a work habit, almost over night? I’d love to hear about it!



Landscape tips to get the most out of selling your home

Editor’s note:¬†We’re excited to have¬†expert guest writer for this post!

By Joe Turpin, Fralich’s Landscape

For most homeowners, selling a home requires touching up the paint and minor cosmetic work inside the house.  What most homeowners don’t think about however is that the first thing any potential homebuyer sees is the exterior entrance to the house.

Here are some tips to help make your curb appeal, more appealing.

Clean-up

The easiest way to tidy up your curb appeal and maximize your dollars is by cleaning up the existing landscape.

Tidy up all plant material by pruning and cutting out any dead branches.

Power-wash decks and walks (just be careful that you don’t strip paint or gouge hardscape surfaces).

Putting down pre-emergent in early spring will help control weeds. Pre-emergent stops weeds from germinating. ¬†Note: DO NOT USE IT if you’re trying to re-seed your lawn.

Remove any dead or overgrown plants. These will make the property look like it has been neglected.



Mulch, mulch, mulch. Fresh mulch has the same effect as new paint. It will liven and clean up your landscape beds.

Make sure you look up while cleaning, messy gutters and chipping paint can ruin the cleanest of landscapes.

Remove Yard Art

Keep your landscape as simple as possible.  Try to remove any yard decorations and novelties.  Buyers tend to go off of their first impression, what may be cute or chic to you may make your landscape look cluttered.

Draw the eye to the entry way

Having had several years in design, the first thing I think about when working on a front yard landscape is the direction of movement your eye takes to the front door.   Subconsciously, when the eye is drawn to the front door, the house seems more inviting.

The easiest method to achieve this is by using the plants from tall to short and repetitive plantings or hedges to move the eye to the door.  You can also use landscape lighting to highlight the front door at night. Yes, potential buyers will drive by your home at night. (See Landscape Lighting Below).

Add color and interest

Adding decorative pots with colorful annuals can really make an impact in the front yard without breaking the bank.  Be sure to give yourself enough time to allow plants to grow before listing.  Add a slow release fertilizer to the soil to increase plant size and remember to water regularly.

Lawn Maintenance

Make sure you keep the lawn mowed and somewhat weed free.  An unkempt lawn will give the appearance of a poorly maintained home.  The easiest method to remove weeds is to use a hose attachment pre-mixed lawn spray.  Most big box stores carry this and it is fairly simple to use.  Expect the weeds to start to disappear after a week.

If your yard is mostly weeds, be ready to grow grass.  Start by killing the weeds first.  You will want to wait at least a week to let the residual weed killer to wear off.



If you are near a rental store, a slice seeder is the best method to reseed your yard.  The slice seeder will put grooves into the yard and drop the seed.  This will keep you from needing to use straw.  Apply a turf starting fertilizer to push the new growth.

Pro-tip:  Most landscape companies use a mixture of bluegrass and rye grass.  Bluegrass takes 2 weeks to germinate so the rye grass is mixed in to establish a lawn faster until the bluegrass takes over.

Landscape Lighting

Adding exterior lighting to the landscape will give a sense of a security to your for potential buyers.  You can also use the lights to highlight the front door and draw buyers to the door at night.  Be sure to use low voltage lighting or led rather than bright fixtures.  The ultimate goal is to highlight the landscape not showcase it like a billboard.

Use landscape lights to highlight areas of interest such as ornamental trees, line pathways for visibility at night and add security by lighting dark areas around windows and back yard access.



Joseph R. Turpin is a student of Landscape Architecture with 10 years of design experience, 15 years of landscape experience and is a current designer for Fralich’s Landscape of Greenfield, Indiana.

Aaron Fralich is the owner of Fralich’s Landscape with 10 years experience in the landscape industry with a background in Agriculture

Connect with¬†Fralich’s Landscape:¬†www.fralichlandscape.com, ¬†317-477-0405,¬†www.facebook.com/fralichs

Connect with 317MulchIt: www.317mulchit.com, 317-685-2448, www.facebook.com/317mulchit

 

Picture Credits:  all pictures are free to use from the Pixabay website or stock photos from Fralich’s Landscape.