I have a confession to make.

I remove wallpaper like I mow my lawn.

We have an awesomely big, zero-turn radius riding mower. It literally cut our mowing time in half when we bought it however many years ago. It’s wide, so it cuts a lot of grass at a time, and it’s fast, so you, well, you get to go fast! My personality is that I don’t do things slow, I go fast.

I’d rather barrel race than pleasure ride.  

I’d rather wakeboard than kayak.

I’d rather snorkel than sunbathe. 

I’d rather TobyMac than Hillsong.

The fast isn’t the issue, the issue is the wide. With a wide mower is it’s hard to take care of the tight spots or get close to the edges. For example, it doesn’t fit between the tree and the fence on both sides of our yard. And, it doesn’t do well around the frame that holds up our bench swing. So, I just do the middle and leave the edging to the Mister.


I found myself doing the same thing with the wallpaper removal. I was fine taking down the big middle parts, but those tight spaces between the window trim and the ceiling? Forget it. And don’t even talk to me about the space between the security system and the door frame. No way. I haven’t broken the news to the Mister yet. But I’m sure in, his heart of hearts, he already knows he’ll have to do the wallpaper edges for me. I’m thankful he’s a patient man. Bless his heart.

Now it’s your turn, which would you rather?

Coming soon: Tips for wallpaper removal.

Ew, what’s that smell?

Pet urine, that’s what. It’s a good thing this blog isn’t Scratch ‘n’ Sniff, just sayin’.

The last family that lived in the flipper wasn’t, how do I put this politely?, um, they weren’t good about putting Rover and Spot out to do their business. Thankfully the seller ripped out most of the carpets before we bought it, but the smell still lingered.

So, first things first, cover the subfloors with Kilz. After covering the family and dining rooms with a good layer of the magical solution, the smell in the house got so much better. It was a big area, here’s a before picture.

I know what you’re thinking, we must keep that sexy wallpaper!

As you can see, it’s a big area and the house immediately smelled so much better! I was thinking, “maybe that’s the only place we have to worry about.” Um, no. When we walked into the kitchen, it smelled like we were walking into a kennel. Ugh.

We had to do something about the kitchen. Pronto! Stat! Fast! Now!

It had this fantastic laminate tile, at least I think it’s laminate, it might be vinyl, here, see for yourself.

I asked the Mister if we could do the kitchen floor next. I’d need him to help me get that tile up and out of there.

He said, “no, we have a master plan, it will have to wait.” So, wait I did, for FOUR WHOLE DAYS! Then, while the Mister was in the back of the house working on his custom-tiled, master shower, featuring Italian tile, I tossed our plan out the window. I had to get that nasty floor out of the kitchen.

Armed with my mask, a box cutter and a crowbar I pushed play on the CD player and the air filled with vintage Audio Adrenaline. Underdog was one of my first Christian records and is still one of my favorites. But I digress. Squirrel!

Anyway, while he was distracted, I went to work on that floor. Surely the smell couldn’t get any worse.




After I pulled the first two tiles up I couldn’t believe my eyes and nose. The smell got worse. The linoleum underneath was wet! Wet with pet urine! How long had that been trapped in there? Did I mention it was still wet? Ew, yuck, gag!

I was praying the urine hadn’t found a way through to the subfloor and those prayers were answered, whomever installed it did a great job! Our subfloors were safe from the damaging effects of the urine.

Removing the tiles and tearing up the linoleum was hard work but I persevered and I got most of it up. And, the Mister didn’t blink an eye when I enlisted him to help carry out the discarded floor. I think he knew I might not follow all the rules. Bless his heart.




7 Tips to buying a home without a realtor

I’m just going to say it, buying a home without a realtor is risky business. But if you must, here’s some tips that I found helped with the process.

Top 7 tips to buying a FSBO property:

1. Get it in writing. I can’t stress this enough. Your lender should be able to provide you with a purchase agreement. Go over it closely, fill out every field, leave nothing blank and spell out everything (i.e. it must appraise, it must pass inspection, etc.). This is your opportunity to negotiate everything. If you have questions about an area on the agreement, ask your lender or consult a real estate attorney.

2. Don’t be afraid to ask for what you want. The great thing about a realtor is they can do all the negotiating for you. They can offer a lower price, they can tell the buyer you don’t like their carpet or wallpaper and ask for replacement money, they can address that weird smell coming from the back bedroom. When you’re FSBO, you must do all of that yourself. Put on your big girl or boy pants and just address it. The worst that can happen is they’ll say no.

3. Keep excellent records. Save a folder of all the communication and paperwork between you and the seller, you and the lender, you and the title company, etc. You will likely need to refer to one or more of them again. I saved one on my desktop so when my lender said, “I need the insurance document.” I could send it again. Yes, I said again. Expect to send them documents more than once. There are so many, I’m not surprised they get lost. If you’re old school and are faxing the documents, get a pocket folder to keep them in.




4. Don’t skip the inspection. This is vital. You need to know what you’re getting into. You may find the most beautiful home, in your price range, but you may not want it if the foundation is crumbling, if it’s infested by termites or the electrical is bad. Don’t trust Uncle Ralph to give it “a good once-over,” hire a professional.

5. Communicate, communicate, communicate. Stay in touch with your lender and your seller. You may need to help coordinate the inspection, the appraisal and any contractor quotes you want done. Texting may be fine, others may prefer a phone call. This is not the time to be shy. See number 2.




6. Use a reputable title company. If you’re getting a mortgage your lender will be able to recommend someone one. If you’re paying cash call a local realtor and ask who they recommend. Title work is something you don’t want to mess around with, it can wreak havoc if not done right. Hire someone local if possible.

7. Make sure you have an “out” if the property doesn’t appraise. A lender won’t lend over the appraised value. To protect yourself, include an out in your purchase agreement if the property doesn’t appraise.

I’d love to hear from you. What tips do you have when buying a FSBO property?




It all started when he got bored… Part II

 

Editor’s note: To see Part I of this story click on “It all started when he got bored” in the archive.

Crazy right?? Buying a house from some stranger on Facebook didn’t seem like a good idea. I mean, we’ve all heard stories of people being lured into a dangerous situation by a stranger online, clears throat, Craigslist. It’s not like I could meet this person in the parking lot of the local Chick-fil-a to make the exchange.

But it looked like too good of a deal to pass up. Wait, could that be another red flag? Maybe. So, I did what any self-respecting cyber-sleuth would do. I Facebook stalked the seller. Afterall, we live in a small community, surely we had a friend or two in common. Low and behold, we had 10 mutual friends! And, wait for it, two of them are in our small group! If you’ve ever been in a small group you know how close you get to these people. I mean, when you meet weekly to study the Bible, you start to really do life together and a family is created. So, I reached out to one of them. The conversation went something like this:

Me: “Hey, do you know So-and-So”?

Bible study friend: “Yes, why?”

Me: “Well, they listed this house on Facebook and I’m thinking about buying it. But don’t want to get kidnapped and killed when I go look at it.”

Bible study friend: “That’s one of my BFFs.”

Me: “U R kidding me!!!!”

Bible study friend: “I promise, you won’t get kidnapped and killed.”

We set a time to have a look at it and in the mean time my Bible study friend contacted her BFF and had her send us the inspection report! What? How does that even happen? The inspection report shared the good, the bad and the ugly.

During the walk through we saw, and smelled, some of the ugly. It would require a lot of elbow grease, some renovating and help from a contactor.

Now, to figure out how to do all the paperwork and negotiating without our beloved realtor friend Jill.